Doddle Logo

Anti-bullying Week Assembly

Anti-bullying Week Assembly

The week of the 13th November marked “Anti-Bullying” week. As Crompton House has a zero tolerance bullying policy, we felt it necessary to present an assembly to lower school about bullying awareness.

In July 2017, the Sixth Form student management team and a group of year 11 prefect students attended a day’s Anti-bullying training, delivered by “Kidscape” – a charitable organisation which aims to provide children, families, carers and professionals with advice, training and practical tools to prevent bullying and protect young lives. Over the course of the day we learned what bullying looks like, the awful impacts that bullying has and how we can do something about it. Our aim was to become peer mentors to younger students who may be being bullied or be struggling in school. The peer mentoring scheme has been rolled out and year 11 peer mentors (aided by Sixth Form students) go into year 7 forms and mentor students to make sure they are finding school life okay and resolving any bullying situations that may be highlighted. The same scheme is going to be rolled out by Sixth Form students for year 11 pupils, to give them academic or pastoral help over their GCSE period, if they need it.

We decided that it was important that we informed the rest of the school about our work so that they know they are in a safe and supportive environment for their learning. So the Sixth Form student management team (some of the peer mentors) delivered the assembly. Also, it was important that all of the students in the assembly understood bullying, so we gave them a physical example; at the start of the assembly we conducted a role play in which one of the teachers was bullied by Sixth Form students and a member of staff intervened. This really engaged everyone and helped them to understand what bullying could actually look like so that in future they can do something to stop it. We also talked about Crompton House’s action plan to deal with such incidents. The role play also helped everyone to understand the parts played in bullying; the bully, the target, the bystanders and the people who intervene.

During the assembly, we highlighted shocking facts about bullying such as:
• 45% of young people experience bullying before the age of 18
• In 2010, 64% of children who were bullied did not report it
• In the UK more than half of young people who are homosexual and bisexual are bullied in schools
These facts really got everyone thinking about the effects of bullying, they can take this information with them to use in and outside of school to raise awareness, stand up for what is right and stop bullying.

The Sixth Form students delivering the assembly got really good feedback from both teachers and younger peers; everyone we spoke to thoroughly enjoyed the assembly and said it really opened their eyes to bullying. This was the response we wanted.
We enjoyed working as a team to devise and present this assembly, we also look forward to helping younger students further with our peer mentoring scheme.

Dominie Smith Scott

The week of the 13th November marked “Anti-Bullying” week. As Crompton House has a zero tolerance bullying policy, we felt it necessary to present an assembly to lower school about bullying awareness.

In July 2017, the Sixth Form student management team and a group of year 11 prefect students attended a day’s Anti-bullying training, delivered by “Kidscape” – a charitable organisation which aims to provide children, families, carers and professionals with advice, training and practical tools to prevent bullying and protect young lives. Over the course of the day we learned what bullying looks like, the awful impacts that bullying has and how we can do something about it. Our aim was to become peer mentors to younger students who may be being bullied or be struggling in school. The peer mentoring scheme has been rolled out and year 11 peer mentors (aided by Sixth Form students) go into year 7 forms and mentor students to make sure they are finding school life okay and resolving any bullying situations that may be highlighted. The same scheme is going to be rolled out by Sixth Form students for year 11 pupils, to give them academic or pastoral help over their GCSE period, if they need it.

We decided that it was important that we informed the rest of the school about our work so that they know they are in a safe and supportive environment for their learning. So the Sixth Form student management team (some of the peer mentors) delivered the assembly. Also, it was important that all of the students in the assembly understood bullying, so we gave them a physical example; at the start of the assembly we conducted a role play in which one of the teachers was bullied by Sixth Form students and a member of staff intervened. This really engaged everyone and helped them to understand what bullying could actually look like so that in future they can do something to stop it. We also talked about Crompton House’s action plan to deal with such incidents. The role play also helped everyone to understand the parts played in bullying; the bully, the target, the bystanders and the people who intervene.

During the assembly, we highlighted shocking facts about bullying such as:
• 45% of young people experience bullying before the age of 18
• In 2010, 64% of children who were bullied did not report it
• In the UK more than half of young people who are homosexual and bisexual are bullied in schools
These facts really got everyone thinking about the effects of bullying, they can take this information with them to use in and outside of school to raise awareness, stand up for what is right and stop bullying.

The Sixth Form students delivering the assembly got really good feedback from both teachers and younger peers; everyone we spoke to thoroughly enjoyed the assembly and said it really opened their eyes to bullying. This was the response we wanted.
We enjoyed working as a team to devise and present this assembly, we also look forward to helping younger students further with our peer mentoring scheme.

Dominie Smith Scott

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.